Short Courses

FAQs

Can I take a short course if I am not registered for the meeting?
YES! You’re welcome to—just add the meeting nonregistrant fee (US$40 by 22 Aug.) to your course enrollment cost. Should you then decide to attend the meeting, your payment will be applied toward meeting registration.

GSA K–12 teacher members: You are welcome to take short courses without registering for the meeting or paying the nonregistrant fee.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs): Most professional development courses and workshops offer CEUs. One CEU comprises 10 hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction. [more]

Contact Jennifer Nocerino, for additional information.

Short courses are open to everyone. Early registration is highly recommended to ensure that courses will run.

Early registration deadline: 22 August  Cancellation deadline: 29 August
Registration after 22 August costs an additional US$30.

Industry Tracks

GSA offers courses relevant to applied geoscientists. Look for these icons that identify sessions in the following areas:
Energy
Economic Geology
Hydrogeology & Environmental Geology
Engineering Geology

Courses are held at the Colorado Convention Center (CCC) unless otherwise noted.

Friday Courses

Click on title for abstract and details.

Cost: US$50; lunch included. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO; Marianne Okal, UNAVCO
Cosponsor: UNAVCO

Abstract: This one-day course will provide faculty, students, and professionals with an introduction to terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, also known as ground-based LiDAR). TLS provides high-resolution 3D images of geologic features and has emerged as a powerful tool for applications ranging from outcrop mapping to analysis of earth surface processes. The course will focus on TLS technology, data collection, processing and analysis, and examples of science and educational applications. A combination of lectures and hands-on demonstrations of TLS equipment and data processing will be used.

Cost: US$25. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Bruce MacFadden, Florida Museum of Natural History; Kent Crippen, Univ. of Florida; Ronny Leder, Florida Museum of Natural History; Eleanor Gardner, Florida Museum of Natural History; Lisa Lundgren, Univ. of Florida; Victor Perez, Univ. of Florida
Cosponsor: The FOSSIL Project

Abstract: Each year, fossil clubs and societies across the U.S. contribute to the study of paleontology via discovery, K–12 programs, and public outreach. However, most of these amateur organizations have limited access to the resources of professional paleontologists and natural history museums, which impacts their ability to participate in collaborative research and outreach projects. This short course, emanating from the work of the NSF-funded FOSSIL Project (Fostering Opportunities for Synergistic STEM with Informal Learners; DRL-1322725), will investigate best practices for engaging both formal and informal STEM learners with paleontological data. Topics to be covered include: (1) contributing to and benefiting from digitization efforts of fossil collections; (2) incorporating fossils into the design of curricula that satisfy Next Generation Science Standards; (3) fostering engagement and learning by amateurs; and (4) using social media to mobilize the community. Laptops are required and digital cameras are recommended.

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Friday-Saturday Courses

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Cost: $US25. Limit: 55. CEUs: 1.6
Instructors: Bret Dixon, Anadarko; Morgan Sullivan, Chevron
Cosponsor: Anadarko

Abstract: This two-day short course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts, and methods of sequence stratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide the stratigraphic record. This methodology allows the identification of coeval facies, documents the time-transgressive nature of classic lithostratigraphic units, and provides geoscientists with an additional way to analyze and subdivide the stratigraphic record. Using exercises that utilize outcrop, core, well-log, and seismic data, the course provides hands-on experience for learning sequence stratigraphy. The exercises include classic case studies from which many sequence stratigraphic concepts were originally developed.

Cost: US$25, includes lunch. Limit: 30. CEUs: 1.6
Instructors: Bob Stewart, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; Tonya Brami, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division

Abstract: This course will explore the concepts, methods, and tools of petroleum geoscience used on a day-to-day basis in the energy industry. We will focus on how we make decisions with limited information, evaluate risk vs. uncertainty, and maximize value from integrated teams. Day 1 reviews fundamental stratigraphic and structural concepts. Day 2 is an applied problem in basin exploration. Students will make play maps, bid on prospective acreage, and analyze individual prospects within that acreage. Throughout the course, we will stress integration across disciplines and scales, focusing on interaction and expression of basin formation, fill, and evolution processes from regional to prospect scale.

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Saturday Courses

Click on title for abstract and details.

Cost: US$25. CEU: 0.7. Limit: 25
Instructors: Declan De Paor, Old Dominion Univ.; Steve Whitmeyer, James Madison Univ.; Callan Bentley, Northern Virginia Community College; Bill Richards, North Idaho College; Kristen St. John, James Madison Univ.; Barb Tewksbury, Hamilton College
Cosponsors: GSA Energy Geology Division; GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geoinformatics Division; GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Geoscience Education; GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Karst Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
EXTRA! Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at GSA’s onsite bookstore.

Abstract: To attract students into earth science, we must spark interest at second level. Teachers are critical to that effort. This course (and associated digital poster session) focuses on helping preservice and in-service teachers to make effective use of technology. Topics include virtual field and lab experiences; Google Earth and Cesium; GigaPans, Photo Spheres, and GIGAmacro; virtual rocks and outcrops; technology for students with disabilities and non-traditional students; virtual reality and augmented reality. Professional development support will be provided to school teachers and undergraduate instructors to cover registration, travel, accommodation, and meals. Contact ddepaor@odu.edu. Limit 25—register early!

Cost: US$70. Limit: 24. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Greg Johnston, Sensors & Software Inc.; Troy De Souza, Sensors & Software Inc.
Cosponsor: Sensors & Software Inc.

Abstract: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a non-invasive subsurface exploration tool used in near-surface geology (<100 meters), geotechnical and environmental surveys, mine safety, forensics, archaeology, utility location, concrete inspection, snow depth measurements, and glaciology. This course will introduce the principles of GPR instrumentation; discuss survey design; provide hands-on data acquisition with a GPR system; and explore data interpretation (including common pitfalls), data processing, and data visualization. No prerequisites are required. Students will receive printed course notes and a PDF copy of a GPR textbook written by Dr. Peter Annan, the founder and CEO of Sensors & Software. Students need to come prepared to work for 2–3 hours outside and, if interested, bring a fully charged PC-based laptop for the data processing portion of the course. The laptop should have Google Earth installed, if possible.

Cost: US$50, includes lunch. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: John Cottle, Univ. of California Santa Barbara; Bradley Hacker, Univ. of California Santa Barbara; Andrew Kylander-Clark, Univ. of California Santa Barbara
Cosponsors: Nu Instruments; Teledyne CETAC; Agilent.

Abstract: Simultaneous isotopic (e.g., U/Th-Pb) and elemental analysis of minerals by laser ablation split-stream ICP mass spectrometry (LASS) is the latest tool for addressing tectonic & petrologic questions. This course will introduce the types of isotopic and elemental analyses that are possible and show how in-situ analyses of accessory minerals in thin section can be applied to quantify igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary processes. This practical course is aimed at faculty members, researchers, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about state-of-the-art petrochronologic research. [more details]

Cost: US$40, includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Ross Knight, Geological Survey of Canada; Bruce Kjarsgaard, Geological Survey of Canada; Lawrence Lemke, Wayne State Univ.; Samuel Mutiti, Georgia College and State Univ.
Keynote Speakers: David Weindorf (Texas Tech University - Applications of PXRF for Pedology, Agronomy, and Environmental Quality Assessment); Harry Rowe (University of Texas, Austin - Drill Core and Cuttings Applications of pXRF: Methods, Pitfalls, Limitations, Aspirations, and Examples); and Nigel Brand (Portable XRF Services, West Perth, Australia - Mineral Exploration: Success and Failure – the application of pXRF).
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; Bruker Scientific.

Abstract: Over the last decade, use of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometers has grown enormously. The instruments are commonly used in mineral exploration, for 'real time' grade assessments in mining operations, environmental characterization, and the determination of chemostratigraphy of both rock and unconsolidated materials. The short course will provide (1) presentations on best practices for sample collection, preparation, analysis, and associated typical pitfalls/problems and solutions; and (2) the application of pXRF spectrometry to environmental and exploration geochemistry. Comparisons will be made with traditional geochemical methods for a variety of applications in the geosciences. At the completion of the course, participants will have sufficient knowledge to implement pXRF spectrometry as a cost-effective practice within a science based analytical workflow.

Cost: US$150. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Jeffrey McKenzie, McGill Univ.; Barret Kurylyk, Univ. of Calgary; Laura Lautz, Syracuse Univ.; Dylan Irvine, Monash Univ.

Abstract: Temperature is increasingly recognized as an important tool for tracing hydrological processes. Although the thermal-hydrology field is several decades old, many important advances in using heat as a tracer of subsurface flow and groundwater-stream interactions have been made in recent years. These include improvements in measurement techniques and new analytical approaches for data analysis. This workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and tools required to begin their own heat tracing projects. Topics will include the theory of subsurface heat transfer, field methods, instrumentation (e.g., temperature loggers, distributed temperature sensing, and infrared cameras), simple solutions for data analysis, and new software for complex datasets. Class exercises will help students familiarize themselves with these tools. Dr. McKenzie is an Associate Professor at McGill Univ. His research focuses on developing numerical models and new applications for using heat as a tracer. Dr. Kurylyk is a postdoc at the Univ. of Calgary with interests in the development of new analytical approaches for using heat as a hydrologic tracer. Dr. Lautz is an Associate Professor at Syracuse Univ. Her research includes application of heat transport theory to characterize water flux between streams and groundwater at different scales. Dr. Irvine is a research fellow at Monash Univ. with expertise in developing useful tools for application in thermal-hydrology research.

Cost: US$50; lunch included. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Katie Snell, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, Brett Davidheiser-Kroll, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Sebastian Kopf, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Julio Sepulveda, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder
Cosponsors: Thermo Scientific; Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, Geological Sciences; INSTAAR

Abstract: This course, run off-site at the Univ. of Colorado (CU) in Boulder, will teach participants about cutting-edge organic, light, and clumped stable isotope concepts, instrumentation, and applications that are part of the analytical focus of the new stable isotope and organic geochemistry laboratories at CU Boulder. The course will cover theory as well as current best practices in sample preparation, analytical measurements, and data processing for all the presented techniques, and include a tour of the lab facilities to provide participants with a better sense for the actual instrumentation and instrument interfaces. The course will cover the following topics: (1) Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur (CHONS) isotope analysis of bulk organic and inorganic materials, with focus on applications in climatology, sedimentology, geobiology and ecology. (2) Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry with focus on applications in earth-surface processes and paleoclimate, basin development, and carbonate diagenesis. (3) Chemical and compound-specific stable isotope (C, H and N) characterization of organic molecules with focus on applications in the analysis of hydrocarbons, environmental samples, and laboratory cultures. (4) Introduction and discussion of data processing techniques that allow for transparent and reproducible reporting and visualization of laboratory results for effective communication and publication of data.

Cost: US$50. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Paul Klipfel, Mineral Resource Services Inc.; Heather Houlton, American Geosciences Institute; Christopher Keane, American Geosciences Institute
Cosponsor: American Geosciences Institute.

Abstract: This course will provide shared experiences of professional geoscientists from a range of subdisciplines (environmental, oil and gas, hazard assessment and mitigation, mineral exploration and mining, engineering, hydrogeology, GIS/3D modeling/dbase management, ethics in the workplace) to help undergraduate, graduate students, and faculty identify skills and competencies critical to employment. In addition, real-life case studies and examples of job tasks will provide students and faculty with practical knowledge about the work-functions of different geoscience occupations. For faculty, the course will review tools and practical examples to integrate into their curriculum appropriate to preparing students for a career in our discipline.

Cost: US$35. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Mark Nielsen, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Minda Berbeco, National Center for Science Education; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Robert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

Abstract: Humans are having a profound and lasting effect on Earth’s systems. In recognition of this, scientists have proposed that we are now living in a new geologic epoch called the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene is an admission that humans are fundamentally changing the nature of Earth systems—a politically, if not scientifically, controversial proposition. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive. Both courses will also present the latest research on the relevant topics and highlight free ready-to-use classroom resources for K–16 teaching about human impacts on planet Earth, all related to the core idea of Earth and human activity found in the Framework for K12 Science Education and The Next Generation Science Standards.

Cost: US$10. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Matt Cannon, Taylor & Francis; Lauren Herman, Taylor & Francis
Cosponsor: Taylor & Francis journals

Abstract: Puzzled by peer-review? Curious about citations? In this half-day workshop, experienced staff from Taylor & Francis journals will guide you through the publication process, giving hints and tips to maximize the citation potential of your research. Through a mix of presentations, group work, and Q&A you will review the whole process of publication, from conception of your idea, through to how to promote your research post-publication, as well as discussing key issues around getting published in the geoscience subject area. This short course will be of interest to anyone who needs to publish—from Ph.D. students or those new to academia looking to make their first publication, through to more experienced authors trying maximize the impact of their research and get an update on the latest trends in academic publishing.

Cost: US$30. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.7
Instructors: George Gehrels, Univ. of Arizona; Jim Bowring, College of Charleston; Noah McLean, Univ. of Kansas; Doug Walker, Univ. of Kansas

Abstract: Participants will be introduced to the fundamentals and applications of U-Th-Pb geochronology, especially as applied to detrital minerals. The course is ideal for faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about U-Th-Pb geochronology and how it can be applied to studies of provenance, source terrane characterization, and maximum depositional age. The course will also introduce participants to new software systems for data reduction and analysis (ET_Redux) and discovery and archiving (Geochron). Familiarity with these powerful and user-friendly systems will be essential for both producers and users of geochronology as analytical precision, accuracy, and spatial resolution improve, as data sets become larger, and as opportunities proliferate to integrate geochronology with other types of geochemical, petrologic, and stratigraphic information.

Cost: US$20. Limit: 25. CEU: 0.7
Instructors: Eric Mittelstaedt, Univ. of Idaho; Jean-Arthur Olive, Columbia Univ.; John Naliboff, Univ. of California Davis
Cosponsor: Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics
EXTRA! Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$20 coupon redeemable at GSA’s onsite bookstore.

Abstract: This one day course is designed to introduce geoscientists with a range of specialties to the concepts of numerical simulation, as well as to provide hands-on experience using a modern, research capable numerical code (SiStER—Simple Stokes with Exotic Rheologies). During this course, we will discuss a range of topics, including an introduction to the appropriate equations for different geodynamic problems and numerical methods for solving those equations, the structure of geodynamics codes, how complex rheologies (e.g., non-linear viscosity, elasticity, plasticity) are implemented in simulations, and the practical aspects of running the SiStER code and visualizing results. By the completion of this course, participants will be able to outline the key components, techniques, and assumptions of a complete lithospheric numerical modeling investigation, as well as have a working knowledge of the structure of the SiStER code. Additionally, participants will gain experience running, modifying input files, and visualizing results using the SiStER code. Finally, several input files with exercises will be supplied to provide a jumping off point for simulating several problems in Earth dynamics, including lithosphere extension and faulting, subduction initiation, the critical taper of a subduction wedge, and thermal convection in the mantle.

Cost: US$30, includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.7
Instructors: Edwin Nissen, Colorado School of Mines; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State Univ.; Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO
Cosponsor: UNAVCO

Abstract: Structure from Motion (SfM), a photogrammetric technique that uses overlapping images to construct 3D surface models, is quickly emerging as a valuable research and education tool in geodesy, geomorphology, structural geology, and related disciplines. Images can be collected with a standard consumer-grade camera, making SfM a low-cost tool that compliments other 3D imaging technologies, such as terrestrial and airborne laser scanning (LiDAR). SfM can be collected from a hand-held camera or an airborne platform such as an aircraft, tethered balloon, kite, or UAS (unmanned aerial system), enabling 3D imaging of features ranging in size from decimeters to several kilometers. This one-day course will provide faculty, students, and professionals with an introduction to SfM technology, data collection and processing, and examples of science and educational applications. A combination of lectures and hands-on demonstrations of SfM equipment and data processing will be used.

Cost: US$35. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Mark Nielsen, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Minda Berbeco, National Center for Science Education; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Robert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

Abstract: Evolution and a deep history of Earth have long been publically controversial, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help teachers and learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive. Both courses will also present the latest research on the relevant topics and highlight free ready-to-use classroom resources for K–16 teaching about human impact on planet Earth, all related to the core idea of Earth and human activity found in the Framework for K12 Science Education and The Next Generation Science Standards.

Cost: US$10. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.3
Instructors: Linda Gundersen, Earth Science, Ethics, and Art; David Mogk, Montana State Univ.
Cosponsors: American Geosciences Institute; GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Geology and Health Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division
EXTRA! Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$10 coupon redeemable at GSA’s onsite bookstore.

Abstract: Explore the ethical and scientific integrity challenges in the geosciences today. Network and dialogue with your peers on issues of resource sustainability, hazard risk assessment, climate change, scientific integrity, open access, intellectual property, conflict of interest, sexual harassment, and gender and other biases. Learn the latest on ethical requirements and guidance from the Geological Society of America, American Geosciences Institute, the National Science Foundation, and the new report from the National Academy of Sciences, as well as the latest global perspectives on scientific integrity and the emerging field of geoethics. Discuss and learn strategies for identifying and resolving scientific integrity and geoethical challenges you may face in your career.

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GSA Associated Society Course

Click on title for abstract and details.

GSA does not handle registration for this course.

PALEONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Cost: FREE, with no registration needed and no course attendance limit.
Instructors: Leif Tapanila, Idaho State Univ.; Imran A. Rahman, Univ. of Oxford

Abstract: Computer-aided, three-dimensional visualization and analysis of fossils, or virtual paleontology, is becoming an increasingly important approach for reconstructing the history of life. Poorly understood or previously unknown morphological details can be described in greater detail than previously possible using non-destructive digital imaging methods. Additionally, functional morphology can be investigated in three dimensions using quantitative computer modelling. However, associated with these advances are new challenges for paleontologists, especially as they relate to the long-term storage of digital data, as well as copyright issues. The goal of this short course is to bring together researchers interested in the broad field of virtual paleontology to present and discuss methods and results, and to set an agenda for future research. Students and others new to virtual paleontology will be introduced to the variety of methods, software, and applications and gain contacts with leading colleagues in the field.

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Canceled Courses

Cost: US$ 322. Limit: 25. CEUs: 1.6
Instructor: Vitor Abreu, Consultant

Abstract: Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology for petroleum geoscientists to interpret the geological record, through integration of cores, well logs, and seismic lines (2D and 3D). This course is designed to provide geoscientists with more advanced methods in sequence stratigraphy to recognize, interpret, and map the key play elements of the petroleum system (reservoir, seal, and source rock). The course will cover problems of predicting play element presence, distribution, and quality from business scales ranging from Exploration to Production. At exploration scale, the course will focus on the recognition criteria for play element distribution and stratigraphic trapping styles. Participants will use the sequence stratigraphic method to identify critical play elements through integration of core, well logs, and seismic lines in depositional settings ranging from shelf to deep water. At development and production stages, the emphasis is on mapping strategies at the reservoir scale. Participants will learn methods for recognition and mapping of connectivity pathways, baffles, and barriers through the integration of production data with well logs, high-resolution seismic lines, and cores.

Cost: US$ 207. Limit: 20. CEUs: 1.6
Instructors: Alok Porwal, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Mumbai; Bijal Chudasama, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Mumbai

Abstract: This short course aims at giving a quick-start to GIS-based mineral potential modeling—a desktop exploration targeting tool used for narrowing down search areas for ground exploration. It would provide the relevant theoretical background and demonstrate important GIS tools and advanced functions that are used for modeling. Special emphasis will be laid on innovative ways of extracting relevant geoscientific information regarding mineralization processes from public domains exploration datasets. The course would involve lectures, demonstration, exercises, and case studies. Course material would be provided in hard copy as well as soft copy. The short course would be conducted in three modules over two days, as follows: Module 1, Day 1, Session 1—Before lunch: Introduction to model-based mineral potential mapping in a GIS environment, the rationale, concepts, components, inputs, and outputs. Spatial data analysis in GIS: Spatial data models and management, elements of geo-processing spatial query and conditional evaluation, reclassification, distance and density estimations, transformations, interpolations and neighborhood operations, map algebra and mathematical operations, map overlay.

Module 2, Day 1, Session 2—After lunch: Selection of model inputs, conceptual modeling of mineral systems, identification of targeting criteria, identification and generating derivative input map layers, quantification of spatial associations, exploratory spatial data analysis, hypothesis testing. Module 3, Day 2 Sessions 1 and 2—Model-based integration of input spatial data: knowledge-driven, data-driven, and hybrid models, linear and non-linear models: Fuzzy Inference Systems, Weights of Evidence models, and Machine learning. Validation, interpretation and evaluation of output resource potential maps.

Cost: US$125. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Madhumitha Raghav, Freeport-McMoRan Inc.; Sarah Doyle, Integral Consulting Inc.; Erick Weiland, Freeport-McMoRan Inc.

Abstract: Failure to predict and effectively manage acid rock drainage (ARD) by mining companies has significant ramifications, with estimated costs of over US$100 billion for total worldwide liability associated with current and future remediation. This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of ARD generation and delve deeply into various ARD prediction test methods accepted as the current standards within the industry and by regulatory agencies, including sample selection strategies during various stages of exploration and mining, sample analysis and interpretation of analytical data. The course will provide an introduction to utilizing the information obtained from these tests to prevent/minimize ARD using effective materials management and water treatment strategies. Development of ARD block model and geochemical conceptual site model will be covered. A wide audience, ranging from junior/mid-level practitioners in the mining industry to undergraduate and graduate students in environmental engineering/sciences, geology, mining engineering, and hydrology will benefit from this course.

Cost: US$249. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Stephen Van der Hoven, Genesis Engineering & Redevelopment Inc.; Tissa Illangasekare, Colorado School of Mines

Abstract: One of the primary routes of human exposure to volatile organic compounds released into the environment is through vapor intrusion into buildings. This short course will provide the latest information and tools regarding vapor intrusion, and the topics covered will be relevant to environmental consultants and other practicing professionals, students, and regulators. Topics during the morning session will include an overview of the physical processes governing subsurface vapor transport and entry into buildings, current findings and trends in research, and state and federal regulatory perspectives on vapor intrusion. The afternoon session will include a field trip to a site for demonstrations of subsurface and indoor air sampling techniques and vapor probe construction.

Cost: US$130, includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.8
Instructors: Kelsey MacCormack, Alberta Geological Survey; Harvey Thorleifson, Minnesota State Geological Survey; Richard Berg, Illinois State Geological Survey.

Abstract: This course will provide registrants with the basic foundation of information necessary to build three-dimensional (3D) geological models and enhance their evaluation and communication of geospatial information within a wide variety of geological contexts. The course will begin by covering some basic geostatistical concepts and how they can be used to enhance geological model development and characterize model uncertainty. Case studies will be presented on a variety of multi-scalar and interdisciplinary investigations, providing attendees the opportunity to see direct application of the information provided during this course to address actual geoscience questions. This course has been designed for both graduate students and industry/consulting geoscientists who would like to learn the essentials for building and evaluating 3D geological models.

Cost: US$25. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Becca Walker, Mount San Antonio College; Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO
Cosponsors: GETSI (GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues); UNAVCO; National Association of Geoscience Teachers

Abstract: Including data analysis and quantitative skills in introductory undergraduate courses is challenging. This short course introduces participants to two 2-week curricular modules - “Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes” and “Surface Process Hazards”. Students use temperature, sea level altimetry, tidal gauge, gravity, GPS, and LiDAR data to consider potential societal implications of sea level rise and mass movements. Appropriate for a broad range of introductory courses, the modules consist of units that may be implemented together or individually. Other shorter activities featuring geodetic data for introductory courses will also be included (e.g. GPS and earthquakes). Modules can be found at http://serc.carleton.edu/getsi.

Cost: US$35. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Karen Kortz, Community College of Rhode Island; Jessica Smay, San Jose City College
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT); Geo2YC Division of NAGT; National Science Foundation.

Abstract: In this strategy-packed, interactive, and flexible workshop, participants will be given concrete examples of and practical advice for using a variety of approaches to make a class more student-centered. Although the examples used will focus on igneous rocks at the introductory level, the skills developed in the workshop are transferable. Strategies planned include think-pair-shares, concept tests, lecture tutorials, jigsaws, gallery walks, skeleton notes, and organizational worksheets. These strategies can be easily integrated in large or small lecture courses, hybrid courses, and flipped classes. A NSF-supported, research-based introductory geology textbook in development will be presented as a useful tool to aid in implementing these activities. The target audience is 2YC and 4YC faculty who want to increase, strengthen, or reinforce their toolkit of teaching strategies.

Cost: US$75. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Chris Scotese, PALEOMAP Project; Michael Tetley, California Institute of Technology.

Abstract: GPlates is a state-of-the-art plate tectonic mapping and visualization program. With it you can make maps for any time in the distant past that show past plate tectonic configurations, ancient paleogeographies, evolving paleoclimates, and changing paleobiogeographic connections. This half-day course will teach you how to install, run, and use GPlates for teaching and research. Copies of the most recent version of GPLates will be provided, and we will show you how to use it in a “hands-on” lab environment. Bring your laptop and begin playing with GPlates!

Cost: US$25. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Bruce Douglas, Indiana Univ.; Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO
Cosponsors: UNAVCO; GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues (GETSI); National Association of Geoscience Teachers

Abstract: Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry are increasingly important research methods for generating high-resolution topographic models, but are typically not part of undergraduate curriculum. In this short course, instructors will be introduced to teaching resources developed by UNAVCO for integrating TLS and SfM into field camps and in-semester field courses. Applications for these methods include stratigraphic analysis, fault scarp analysis, and change detection and can give insights into topics from energy research and paleoclimate to earthquakes, landslides, and flooding hazards. Materials are appropriate for courses such as field methods, structural geology, geophysics, and geomorphology. This short course focuses on the teaching resources themselves, and practical experiences using these resources in undergraduate field education. For those interested in exposure to TLS technology, we recommend also registering for the “Introduction to Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) for Earth Science Research and Education” short course scheduled the preceding day.

Cost: US$110. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Todd Halihan, Oklahoma State Univ.; Marcy Bogren, Aestus LLC; Stuart McDonald, Aestus LLC

Abstract: Characterization of contaminated sites has evolved from simple source and plume models to the evaluation of mixed waste plumes, undergoing a range of degradation and in situ remediation reactions. This short course spends an afternoon evaluating state of the art field and office tooling available to acquire, visualize, and integrate data from complex environmental sites. Field equipment for geophysical and direct push evaluation will be available along with experts in data acquisition, visualization, integration, and regulation of these techniques.

Cost: US$25. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Bruce Douglas, Indiana Univ.; Vince Cronin, Baylor Univ.; Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO
Cosponsors: GETSI (GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues); UNAVCO; National Association of Geoscience Teachers

Abstract: Despite its growing importance in societally critical fields such as hazard mitigation and climate change, geodetic techniques and data are seldom found in undergraduate courses—even for majors. This short course gives instructors hands-on experience with two curricular modules that feature LiDAR, InSAR, and GPS data applied to better understanding and mitigating earthquake hazards. Modules are appropriate for courses such as structural geology, geophysics, tectonics, and geomorphology. Modules consist of units that may be implemented together or individually. A module about water resource applications of GPS and gravity data will also be presented in brief. Modules are online at http://serc.carleton.edu/getsi.

Cost: US$45. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Elizabeth Nagy-Shadman, Pasadena City College; Kyle Gray, Univ. of Northern Iowa
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

Abstract: This short course will introduce participants to three different 50–60-minute InTeGrate (Interdisciplinary Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future) activities designed for introductory level geoscience courses that use real data and make connections to societal issues that students can relate to in their everyday lives. Attendees will leave the course with active learning strategies and resources for exciting activities that can be immediately incorporated into many types of courses. Topics include (1) selecting which schools to fund in a seismically hazardous region; (2) considering the global supply and demand relationship of REEs; and (3) creating an informational brochure that a city could use to educate its citizens on the impact of living near a river, including background information, flood profiles, future potential, flood prevention, and positive impacts of the river on the city.

Cost: US$25. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4
Instructors: Shelley Olds, UNAVCO; Roger Groom, Mount Tabor Middle School; Robert­-Michael de Groot, SCEC (Southern California Earthquake Center)
Cosponsors: UNAVCO; National Association of Geoscience Teachers

Abstract: In this fun and interactive half­day short course, middle­ and high­ school teachers will explore modern technologies used to study tectonic motions, develop earthquake early warning systems, and construct earthquake-resistant buildings. Teachers will use high­precision GPS data and maps from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory to identify areas with earthquake risk. They will explore authentic earthquake data using Quake­catcher sensors from the Quake Catcher Network (QCN), a collaborative citizen science initiative. To mitigate shaking impacts and building resonance during earthquakes, teachers will apply NGSS engineering design elements to construct and test shake-resistant buildings. Bring your laptop or tablet. Free learning materials and posters will be provided. UNAVCO and SCEC provide free and open access to data and instructional materials to teach about Earth processes.

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