Short Courses

Two-Year College Faculty

Subaru of America, Inc. Thanks to Subaru of America, Inc., 23 two-year college professors (at least half-time) who attend any one short course will be reimbursed US$200!

[ more info ]

2-for-1 Special
See the 517, 518, and 519 series of courses for extra value.

Friday-Saturday
Courses

Saturday
Courses

Associated
Society Courses

Short courses are open to everyone. Early registration is highly recommended to ensure that courses will run.
Click on the title for the course description and CEUs.

Early registration deadline: 15 Sept.
Registration after 15 September costs an additional US$30
Cancellation deadline: 22 Sept.

Where Are Courses Held?

Unless stated otherwise, GSA Short Courses will all meet on the Simon Fraser University Vancouver campus. The buildings we will use are the SFU Harbour Centre, the Segal Graduate School of Business, and the Wosk Centre for Dialogue. These buildings are located in downtown Vancouver, within a 5–10-minute walking distance from the Vancouver Convention Centre.

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FAQs

Can I take a short course if I’m not registered for the meeting?
YES! Just add a meeting nonregistrant fee (US$40 by 1 Oct.) to your course enrollment cost. If you then decide to attend the meeting, your payment will be applied toward meeting registration.
GSA K–12 teacher members do not need to register for the meeting or pay the nonregistrant fee in order to sign up for short courses.

Will I get continuing education credits (CEUs)?
YES! After the meeting, contact Jennifer Nocerino for a meeting evaluation form. After we receive your evaluation, we will send a CEU certificate to you in the mail (usually within two weeks). Check each course description for the CEUs offered.

I have already registered for the meeting, and I'd like to add a short course. Can I still add a course?
YES! If you have already registered for the meeting and paid you will need to call our Sales and Services Office to add a course to your current registration. Please call or email GSA Sales & Service, +1-303-357-1000, option 3 or +1-888-443-4472 (toll-free), fax: +1-303-357-1070.

Is there someone I can contact for questions about my short course?
YES! Please contact Jennifer Nocerino, +1-303-357-1036
 

Friday–Saturday Courses

Click on the title for the course description and CEUs.

501. Sequence Stratigraphy for Graduate Students

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Segal Building, Event rooms 1200, 1300, 1500
Cost: US$25; includes lunch. Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Bret Dixon, Anadarko; Art Donovan, BP; Morgan Sullivan, Chevron; Bob Stewart; ExxonMobil; Kirt Campion, Marathon
Cosponsors: Anadarko; BP; Chevron; ExxonMobil; Marathon; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division

CEU: 1.6 | Max. class size: 55

Course Description
This two-day short course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts, and methods of sequence stratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide the stratigraphic record. This methodology allows the identification of coeval facies, documents the time-transgressive nature of classic lithostratigraphic units, and provides geoscientists with an additional way to analyze and subdivide the stratigraphic record. Using exercises that utilize outcrop, core, well-log, and seismic data, the course provides hands-on experience for learning sequence stratigraphy. The exercises include classic case studies from which many sequence stratigraphic concepts were originally developed.

502. Field Safety Leadership

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Classroom 1315
Cost: US$25; includes continental breakfast and lunch
Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Kevin Bohacs, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; David Story, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Pam Collins, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; ExxonMobil Exploration Co.

CEU: 1.6 | Max. class size: 24

Course Description
Participants will acquire and practice strategies and tactics to prepare for and conduct safe and effective field activities. The first day of this fully interactive course covers common injuries, why accidents occur (human factors analysis), first aid, and the field safety process in normal operations and emergency response through scenario analysis, problem solving, and role play. On the second day, participant teams will take turns leading a model field day at a site near Vancouver, including briefings, driving, hiking, risk assessment, intervening for safety, safety equipment use, and emergency response drills. Participants will realize a greater value from this course if they obtain a Wilderness First Aid certificate prior to attending this course, but it is certainly not required.

503. Introduction to Petroleum Structural Geology

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Segal Building, Strategy Room 2300
Cost: US$25; includes continental breakfast and lunch
Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: J. Steve Davis, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Peter Hennings, ConocoPhillips
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; ConocoPhillips; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division

CEU: 1.6 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to introduce faculty and M.S. and Ph.D. geoscience students to the fundamental subdisciplines within petroleum structural geology, including approaches to seismic structural interpretation, reservoir geomechanics, and trap analysis. This course uses practical exercises to emphasize the application of structural interpretation to studies of petroleum entrapment, reservoir deformation, and the interaction of multi-phase fluids with geologic structures and reservoirs. The course lasts two days, and participants need to attend both days to gain the maximum benefit.

504. Structural and Stratigraphic Concepts Applied to Basin Exploration

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Classroom 1520
Cost: US$25; includes continental breakfast and lunch
Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Lori Summa, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Bob Stewart, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; Renee Breedlovestrout, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division

CEU: 1.6 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This course will explore the concepts, methods, and tools of petroleum geoscience used on a day-to-day basis in the energy industry. We will focus on how we make decisions with limited information, evaluate risk vs. uncertainty, and maximize value from integrated teams. Day 1 reviews fundamental stratigraphic and structural concepts. Day 2 is an applied problem in basin exploration. Students will make play maps, bid on prospective acreage, and analyze individual prospects within that acreage. Throughout the course, we will stress integration across disciplines and scales, focusing on interaction and expression of basin formation, fill, and evolution processes from regional to prospect scale.

505. Siliciclastic Core-Logging for Graduate Students

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Burnaby Campus at SFU (Offsite, transportation will be provided)
Cost: US$75
Instructors: Shahin Dashtgard, Simon Fraser Univ.; James MacEachern, Simon Fraser Univ.
Cosponsors: SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology); GSA Sedimentary Geology Division

CEU: 1.4 | Max. class size: 24

Course Description
This two-day course is designed to give graduate students new insights into the best methods for the logging of siliciclastic rocks. In particular, we will address the textural, physical sedimentological, and ichnological characteristics needed to properly describe a core. We will review a wide range of depositional environments, and will instruct participants in the specific facies features characteristic of these settings.gsa-logo_14C.eps

527. Earthscope Institute: Geochronology and the Earth Sciences

 

When: Fri.-Sat., 17-18 Oct., 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Labatt Hall 1700
Cost: US$50, free for students. Includes lunch.
Instructors: Rebecca Flowers, University of Colorado-Boulder; James Metcalf, University of Colorado-Boulder; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; Blair Schoene, Princeton University; Tammy Rittenour, Utah State University
Cosponsors: NSF-EarthScope; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Volcanology, and Petrology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; and GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division

CEU: 1.6 | Max. class size: 80.

Course Description

Additional spots in the short course have been opened up, however students who register after 10 September, will not be eligible to apply for travel reimbursement.

This course will kick off a newly-funded NSF-EarthScope education and student award program that seeks to connect Earth scientists with geochronology facilities and expertise, and provide funds for graduate students to use geochronology in their own research. This short course has two primary functions: First, it will introduce participants to the fundamentals of geochronology of relevance to EarthScope science. Experts in numerical dating techniques will give introductory seminars on the basic theory and application of well-established geochronologic methods, as well as highlight examples of how different geochronology methods have been used to decipher the temporal evolution of the North American continent. Topics will include an overview of the theory of geochronology, as well as lectures on a variety of the most common dating techniques. Second, the course will introduce a new EarthScope Geochronology Graduate Student Research and Training program, a multi-year project that will offer support of up to $10,000 to graduate students to collect and interpret geochronology data through visits and hands-on data acquisition in participating geochronology labs. Student registration is free, and there will be a limited number of travel grants available to help offset travel and lodging costs for graduate students. [ more details ]

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Saturday Courses

Click on the title for the course description and CEUs.

506. Near-Surface Geophysics for Non-Geophysicists

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre Boardroom 2200
Cost: US$105; includes course materials
Instructor: Gregory Baker, Univ. of Tennessee

CEU: 0.8 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This one-day short course—designed for faculty and students with little or no background in geophysics—provides a brief overview of state-of-the-art near-surface geophysical techniques and applications. The principle objectives for participants are to develop sufficient comprehension of methods to (1) better understand potential applications (including pitfalls and constraints) to their present/future research; and (2) be able to more readily interact and define objectives with geophysical experts when developing collaborations. We will focus on surface (as opposed to borehole) techniques and include seismic (reflection, refraction, and surface waves), ground penetrating radar, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods.

507. Introduction to Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) for Earth Science Research

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre Policy Room 1600
Cost: US$41. Includes lunch.
Instructors: Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO; Marianne Okal, UNAVCO; Carlos Aiken, Univ. of Texas at Dallas Cosponsor: UNAVCO

CEU: 0.8 | Max. class size: 24

Course Description
This one-day course will provide faculty, students, and professionals with an introduction to Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS—aka ground-based LiDAR). TLS provides high-resolution three-dimensional images of geologic features, and has emerged as a powerful tool for applications ranging from outcrop mapping to analysis of earth surface processes. The course will focus on TLS technology, data collection, processing and analysis, and examples of science applications. A combination of lectures and hands-on demonstrations of TLS equipment and data processing will be used. Limited financial support is available for students (see the UNAVCO Short Course Series page at http://www.unavco.org/edu_outreach/short-courses/short-courses.html for details).

508. The Water-Energy Nexus: Earth-Science Research Questions

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Canceled.

Canceled.

509. Seismic Structural Interpretation for Academic Faculty

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, 7th Floor PC Lab
Cost: US$100
Instructors: Bob Krantz, ConocoPhillips; Simon Kattenhorn, ConocoPhillips; Barbara Tewksbury, Hamilton College
Cosponsors: ConocoPhillips; Badley Geoscience

CEU: 0.8 | Max. class size: 20

Course Description
Recent collaborations between structural geologists in academia and industry have illuminated the similarities and differences in how they visualize and interpret 3D structures, whether derived from surface outcrop or subsurface seismic data. This course will provide an introduction to 3D seismic data interpretation using a structurally oriented industry software toolkit. The day will begin with a virtual field trip to a well-exposed fault system, followed by a seismic interpretation module based on the same fault zone. The second interpretation module will use a more typical industry data set. PC workstations will be provided and no prior seismic experience is required!

510. Wet Slimy Convecting Rockball: Geobiology, Earth/Life Coevolution and the Ubiquity of Biofilms

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: UBC Beaty Biodiversity Museum (Offsite, easy directions on public transport will be provided)
Cost: US$$88
Instructors: Kurt Grimm, Univ. of British Columbia; Sean Crowe, Univ. of British Columbia

CEU: 0.8 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
Geobiology arises where the earth sciences and microbiology overlap and coevolve. Extending deeply into environmental remediation, economic geology, and Earth’s environmental changes, geobiology constitutes an eco-evolutionary synthesis, extending from deep time to present, across molecular to circum-planetary scales. Global tectonics require and perpetuate the coevolution of fluids and rocks to perpetuate complex microbial communities, and the biofilms that require and perpetuate them. That sentence—a pattern of loops within loops—mimics eco-physiology of microbial communities and planet Earth. This course is a simple and practical synthesis—Biofilms Everywhere. We will integrate specimens, the OmniglobeTM **http://www.arcscience.com** and unique conceptual art **drkurtgrimm.com** into a hands-on and field-based exploratory pedagogy (DeepTime SpaceWalkTM). Using this lecture-lean, case-study approach, participants will survey fundamentals and leave well prepared to apply and inoculate innovation in the biogeosciences.

511. Apple iPad and iPhone as Tools for Field Use

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–4 p.m.
Canceled.

Canceled.

512. Geobiodiversity Database and Quantitative Stratigraphy

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre Boardroom 2250
Cost: US$20. Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$20 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Junxuan Fan, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology; Peter Sadler, Univ. of California at Riverside; H. David Sheets, Canisius College; Shuang-ye Wu, Univ. of Dayton
Cosponsors: Chinese Academy of Sciences; State Key Lab of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy at Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology

CEU: 0.75 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
The Geobiodiversity Database (GBDB) is the formal database of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). Its goal is to facilitate regional and global scientific collaborations focused on regional and global correlation, quantitative stratigraphy, systematics, biodiversity dynamics, paleogeography, and paleoecology. This one-day short course will focus on the GBDB and its applications in quantitative stratigraphy. This course will consist of a combination of lectures and hands-on exercises. Participants will learn how to contribute data, search data, download data, and analyze data. All participants must bring a laptop.

513. Introductory Remote Sensing for Geoscientists

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Canceled.

Canceled.

514. Deep Carbon through Deep Time

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Studies Lab 2945
Cost: US$30. Includes lunch.
Instructor: Robert Hazen, Carnegie Institution of Washington and Deep Carbon Observatory
Cosponsors: Mineralogical Society of America; Carnegie Institution; Deep Carbon Observatory

CEU: 0.7 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
Carbon plays unparalleled roles in Earth. It is the element of life, providing the chemical backbone for all essential biomolecules. Carbon-based fuels supply most of society’s energy, while carbon-bearing molecules in the atmosphere play major roles in Earth’s variable and uncertain climate. Yet in spite of carbon’s importance, many aspects of the physical, chemical, and biological behavior of Earth’s subsurface carbon-bearing systems—particularly the evolution of those systems through deep time—remain unresolved. This groundbreaking GSA short course will bring together for the first time diverse experts from geology and biology to explore this topic. In addition to seven overview lectures by leading educators, ample time will be devoted to questions and informal interactions.

515. Subaqueous Paleoseismology Methods

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–4 p.m.
Canceled.

Canceled.

516. An Introduction to POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) Using Climate Change Activities

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–4 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Seminar Room 1510
Cost: US$15. Includes lunch.
Instructor: Daniel King, Drexel Univ. Cosponsor: National Science Foundation

CEU: 0.6 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
Participants will be introduced to a student-centered pedagogy called POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning **www.pogil.org**). POGIL is a pedagogical approach that uses group activities to teach content and process skills. During the first half of the workshop, participants will receive a general introduction to the POGIL pedagogy. During the second half of the workshop, participants will have the opportunity to experience a set of NSF-funded climate change–based activities that could be used in an introductory environmental science course.

517A. Teaching Geoscience in Society: Building Relevance and Interest in the Geosciences by Adding InTeGrate Resources to Your Class

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2280
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 517C or 517D)
Instructors: Anne Egger, Central Washington Univ.; David McConnell, North Carolina State Univ.
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
What can we do to reframe the geosciences in ways that engage students in our classes? How do we prepare these students for a future where they will confront climate change, water availability issues, resource depletion, and other grand challenges that will require a robust understanding of the intersection between the geosciences and society? One key strategy is to incorporate these issues into geoscience teaching at all levels and for all students. InTeGrate has developed a set of community-built modules that directly address Earth-related grand challenges. These modular units can be adopted wholesale or in parts, and each feature resources to develop students’ abilities to address interdisciplinary problems, improve geoscientific thinking skills, make use of authentic geoscience data, and incorporate systems thinking. These materials have been developed and tested by faculty at a variety of types of institutions and come with built in assessments and resources for both instructors and students. Topics range from environmental justice and freshwater resources to climate change, mineral resources, sustainable land use, and natural hazards. In this workshop, we will explore the InTeGrate materials, discuss the underlying design rubric, and work with participants to adapt the materials to their institutional and geographic setting.

517B. Improving Spatial Thinking in the Geological Sciences

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2290
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 517C or 517D)
Instructors: Basil Tikoff, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison; Tim Shipley, Temple Univ.
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
This course is designed to help educators improve students’ spatial reasoning. The material is a based on a decade-long collaboration between cognitive scientists, geoscience educators, and geoscience researchers through SILC (Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center). The workshop consists of mostly hands-on activities with some introductory lectures. Lectures will focus on known difficulties in student learning of spatial skills, laboratory studies designed to evaluate and improve spatial skills, and a cognitive framework for addressing spatial cognition. Hands-on sessions will highlight effective interventions that can be used in a geoscience classroom, including artificial intelligence–based approaches to sketching.

517C. Student Learning Outcomes and Program Assessment

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2280
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 517A or 517B)
Instructors: David Mogk, Montana State Univ.; Mary Savina, Carleton College
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
This course is intended for department heads/chairs and faculty interested in curriculum development at the department level. This interactive workshop will use the “matrix method of curriculum design” to help you define student learning outcomes related to mastery of geologic concepts and content, technical skills used in the geosciences, geoscience “habits of mind,” higher-order thinking skills, and other professional skills (e.g., communication, quantitative, interpersonal, information). This approach can be used as a guide for faculty to define course goals and specific student learning outcomes in individual courses. In aggregate, this method can be used to map student learning outcomes for entire degree programs to identify areas of strength in departments or to conduct a gap analysis in course offerings. The results can then be used to assess degree programs with respect to the current state of knowledge and conduct of modern geoscience, expectations for students entering the workforce, and alignment of degree programs with departmental or institutional role and scope statements. This workshop will help you explore the student learning outcomes that are most important to your degree program(s) as they apply to your students, institutional type, geographic setting, breadth of disciplines covered in your department, departmental resources, and faculty.

517D. Extreme Makeover Geosciences Style—Infusing Existing Curricula with the Spirit of the New Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): Integrating Content, Scientific and Design Practices, and Cross-Cutting Themes

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2290
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 517A or 517B)
Instructors: Aida Awad, Maine East High School; Susan Buhr, Univ. of Colorado; Sara Harris, Univ. of British Columbia
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
What happens when you give your existing curricula an extreme makeover? During this half-day workshop, we’ll work together to infuse existing curricula with the spirit of the Next Generation Science Standards: integrating content, scientific and design practices, and cross-cutting themes. Increase your impact by including more systems thinking, modeling, designing solutions to global challenges, and quantitative thinking in your instruction. The approach we will take is relevant to instruction from pre-college through undergraduate levels and teacher professional development. The workshop will include an introduction to the Next Generation Science Standards, an opportunity to experience teaching material examples before and after, and working in small groups to makeover one of your own lessons or units.

518A. Teaching Controversial Issues 1: Climate and Energy

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 470
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 518D, 518E, or 518F)
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Scott Mandia, Suffolk County Community College; Ronert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
Climate and energy are topics rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

518B. The Crunching of Cascadia: Discovering Deformation with Data

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2260
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 518D, 518E, or 518F)
Instructors: Shelley Olds, UNAVCO; Nancy West, Quarter Dome Consulting; Vince Cronin, Baylor Univ.
Cosponsors: UNAVCO

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This course provides the resources to teach about convergent plate margins with GPS data. Subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate is distorting the western margin of the Pacific Northwest with strain building toward another great earthquake. More than 40 have occurred over the last 10,000 years. Participants will explore Cascadian deformation and strain intuitively with models, qualitatively with vectors from GPS time series data, and quantitatively in a graphical analysis. Middle and high school teachers will experience activities within UNAVCO’S investigation, “The Crunching of Crust: Deformation, Distortion, and Destruction.” Seismic data, LiDAR, and seismic tomography will also be included.

518C. Crosscutting Earth Themes

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Canceled.

Canceled.

518D. Teaching Controversial Issues 2: Evolution of Life and Earth

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 470
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 518A, 518B, or 518C)
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Glenn Dolphin, Univ. of Calgary; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Scott Mandia, Suffolk County Community College; Ronert Ross, Paleontological Research Institute and its Museum of the Earth
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
Evolutionary history and ocean science are rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

518E. Yellowstone National Park as a Hotbed for Inquiry

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2260
Cost: US$35 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 518A, 518B, or 518C)
Instructors: Shelley Olds, UNAVCO; Nancy West, Quarter Dome Consulting; Vince Cronin, Baylor Univ. Cosponsor: UNAVCO

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This course will provide teachers with lessons and activities regarding Yellowstone’s dynamic landscape. Middle- and high-school teachers will experience UNAVCO’S data-rich investigation, “Taking the Pulse of Yellowstone’s ‘Breathing’ Volcano: Problem-Based Learning in America’s First National Park.” Data includes the region’s eruption history, hydrothermal activity, seismicity, GPS, LiDAR, INSAR, and seismic tomography. The module focuses on Yellowstone; however, the park’s deformation connects to investigating tectonic activity, natural hazards, crustal deformation and strain throughout the West. Instruction will include models, demonstrations, analyzing data, and discussing how to use these materials in teaching. All course materials are free to the public.

518F. Introduction to Critical Zone Science and Observatories

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Canceled.

Canceled.

519A. Digital Mapping and Data Collection for Field Environments

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Strategy Room 320
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 519C or 519D)
Instructors: Steven Whitmeyer, James Madison Univ.; Terry Pavlis, Univ. of Texas–El Paso; Lawrence Malinconico, Lafayette College; Richard Langford, Univ. of Texas–El Paso
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
Apply for Participant Support

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This half-day short course will focus on digital field mapping and data collection, and provide participants with hands-on exposure to modern hardware and software solutions. The course will emphasize proven hardware/software solutions, such as QGIS (Quantum GIS) and ArcGIS, and mobile apps, such as iGIS and GeoFieldBook. Other software and hardware options will be discussed, and participants should plan to relate their own experiences with digital field equipment and methods. The course will conclude with discussions of the limitations of various hardware and software solutions, and potential technologies of the future. Mobile devices will be provided for participants to use. All participants must bring their own laptops.

519B. GigaPan and GigaMacro for the Geosciences

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 370
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with an afternoon course (add 519C or 519D)
Instructors: Jennifer Piatek, Central Connecticut State Univ.; Bill Richards, North Idaho College; Ron Schott, Bakersfield College
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
Apply for Participant Support

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This half-day course will focus on the use of GigaPans in the classroom and as research tools. The course will emphasize use of gigapixel images such as GigaPans in classroom settings, as field datasets, and as “virtual lab materials.” We will touch briefly on the creation of GigaPan images, but plan to focus on the utility of these images rather than collecting them. We will guide participants in exploring the GigaPan website, including advanced search techniques and organization of pans into galleries, as well as strategies for presenting pans in embedded webpages and different viewers. We will explore how GigaPans can be used as field trip “guides,” both as a virtual field experience and as an extension of information available when in the field. Participants are encouraged to bring their own computers to take advantage of the hands-on experience.

519C. Google Maps Engine, Earth Engine, and Big GeoData

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Strategy Room 320
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 519A or 519B)
Instructors: Jeffrey Ryan, Univ. of South Florida; Kristen St. John, James Madison Univ.
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
Maps Engine and Earth Engine, newly available Google data management and visualization tools, permit student co-creation and visualization of large geoscience data sets in either the Google Maps or Google Earth platforms. This half-day short course will introduce Maps Engine and Earth Engine, guide participants in the development of tailored visualizations working with global marine geoscience data from the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) informatics portal, and highlight effective instructional strategies for investigating fundamental geoscience questions and issues via global geo-datasets.
Apply for Participant Support

519D. Using Google Earth to Teach Interpretation of Geologic Processes, Bedrock Structures, and Geologic History

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Centre for Dialogue, Executive Room 370
Cost: US$50 for one course — or get two-for-one! — pay the same amount when combined with a morning course (add 519A or 519B)
Instructors: Barbara Tewksbury, Hamilton College; Heather Almquist, Univ. of Montana
Cosponsors: GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA Geobiology & Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division, GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers Geo2YC Division
Apply for Participant Support

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
This half-day course will have two tracks. Track 1 will be aimed primarily at college/university-level faculty and will give participants hands-on experience with a powerful strategy for using Google Earth to visualize bedrock structures in 3D, create geologic maps and construct cross sections, and learn to interpret geologic structures from outcrop patterns both in Google Earth and on geologic maps. Track 2 will be aimed primarily at pre-service and in-service K–12 teachers and will give participants hands-on experience with a versatile method for allowing students to explore the geology of a local area and create tours in Google Earth that describe aspects of geology and geologic history. During the last portion of the workshop, each participant will have the opportunity to continue working in his/her original track or switch tracks for an abbreviated introduction to the other approach.

520. Optical Properties of Minerals in Thin Section: Quantitative Methods in Birefringence

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2050
Cost: US$25
Instructor: James Nicholls, Univ. of Calgary

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Course Description
Upper division undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty will learn to use birefringence as a quantitative rather than qualitative tool. Students will learn how to combine crystallographic features, optical features, and quantitative estimates of birefringence to determine the orientation of crystals in thin section. They will be able to make statements that range from the less precise: The wave normal must be between 20 degrees and 40 degrees from Bxo; to the more precise: the wave normal lies in (010), approximately 25 degrees from the a-axis.

521. Making Digital Geologic Maps with the NCGMP09 Database Schema

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Where: Harbour Centre, Policy Room 2270
Cost: US$78
Instructor: Ralph Haugerud, U.S. Geological Survey

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 40

Course Description
The Association of American State Geologists and the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the USGS have supported development of a standard database schema for digital geologic maps. Learn how use this schema. We will digitize a manuscript map, make new map data via on-screen interpretation of remotely-sensed data, and discuss the translation of already-digital data from other schemas. Participants should have a working knowledge of ArcGIS.

522. Developing an Effective Broader Impacts Plan for Engaging Undergraduate Researchers

This course has been canceled.

Canceled.

523. Getting Started in Undergraduate Research for New, Future, and Current Faculty

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2200
Cost: US$40
Instructor: Lydia Fox, Univ. of the Pacific
Cosponsor: Council on Undergraduate Research Geosciences Division

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 20

Course Description
This workshop is for faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students. Topics will focus on integrating research practices into the classroom, scaling projects for students, effective approaches to mentoring undergraduate researchers, and identifying funding sources. Based on the demographics of our participants, we may also include information on how to get a job at an academic institution where undergraduate research is required/emphasized.

524. Hands-On Experiences with Stable Isotopes in the Geosciences Curriculum

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Boardroom 2050
Cost: US$25. Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Anne Jefferson, Kent State Univ.; Elizabeth Griffith, Univ. of Texas Arlington; Joseph Ortiz, Kent State Univ.; David Dees, Kent State Univ.
Cosponsor: National Science Foundation

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 20

Course Description
This course will provide an overview of the pros and cons of using laser-based stable isotope technology with undergraduates in coursework and research. It will include a panel discussion and evaluation of active learning modules using water stable isotopes to investigate Rayleigh distillation and hydrograph separation for in courses with geochemistry, stratigraphy, hydrology, or oceanography components. Participants will propose and develop future modules for use in settings with and without access to instrumentation. Instructors will also discuss assessment techniques and the value of collaboration with educational researchers.

525. Geoscience Career Workshop: Launch Your Job Search

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 1–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Fletcher Theatre 1900
Cost: US$15. Extra! Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a US$15 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Brent Lyon, David Alpin Group & Patrick McAndless, Imperial Mining Corp.
Cosponsor: Geological Society of America Careers Program

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 100

Course Description
This workshop is intended to help students and recent graduates successfully prepare for a career in the geosciences. Workshop facilitators bring over 50 years of experience in the private sector and will cover constructing effective cover letters, résumés, and CV’s. Company representatives from Hess Corporation, Newmont Mining, and ExxonMobil will meet with the group and offer tips and suggestions for navigating their company’s hiring process.
Register here.

526. Detrital Mineral U-Pb Geochronology and Hf Isotope Geochemistry: Theory, Methodology, and Applications to Northern Cordilleran Research

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: Harbour Centre, Policy Room 7000
Cost: US$35
Instructor: George Gehrels, University of Arizona.

CEU: 0.7 | Max. class size: 50

Course Description
Topics will cover the fundamentals of U-Th-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope geochemistry applied to detrital minerals, with an emphasis on tectonic analysis of the northern Cordillera. The course is ideal for faculty members and graduate and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about these isotope systems and how they can be applied to studies of provenance and source terrane characterization. Topics will include (1) the basics of the U-Th-Pb and Lu-Hf decay systems; (2) measurement methodologies and challenges; (3) data analysis; (4) coordinated application of the two systems to detrital minerals; (5) and future directions. The course is focused on the use of laser-ablation–inductively-coupled-plasma–mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

527. Earthscope Institute: Geochronology and the Earth Sciences

When: Fri.-Sat., 17-18 Oct.
Click here for details.

Where: Harbour Centre, Labatt Hall 1700
Cost: US$50, free for students. Includes lunch.
Instructors: Rebecca Flowers, University of Colorado-Boulder; James Metcalf, University of Colorado-Boulder; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; Blair Schoene, Princeton University; Tammy Rittenour, Utah State University
Cosponsors: NSF-EarthScope; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Volcanology, and Petrology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; and GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division

528. Science Communications Workshop — Tools for Scientists: Be Heard & Be Interesting - Substance and Style for Better Science Communication

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon
Click here for details.

CEU: 0.4 | Max. class size: 30

Where: Hyatt Regency Vancouver
Cost: Professionals: US$35; students US$25. Includes continental breakfast.

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GSA ASSOCIATED SOCIETY COURSES

Note: GSA does not handle registration for these courses.
Please use the contact information provided online to learn more and to register.

Click on the title for the course description and CEUs.

SOCIETY OF ECONOMIC GEOLOGISTS

Applied Structural Geology in Exploration and Mining

When: Fri.–Sat., 17–18 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Where: SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc., Oceanic Plaza, 22nd Floor, 1066 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6E 3X2, Canada
Cost: Fees TBD; Registration opens 15 July 2014.
Instructors: Julia Kramer Bernhard, SRK Consulting; Hubert Mvondo, SRK Consulting; Wayne Barnett, SRK Consulting; Findlay Craig, SRK Consulting
Register here starting 15 July 2014.  Early registration fees: 15 July - 2 September 2014.   Please contact Elizabeth Holley with any questions.

Max. class size: 20

Course Description
Mineral deposits are commonly associated with structures such as veins, folds, and faults. Understanding these structures is critical for target definition, resource modeling, and mine design. As such, structural geology provides valuable inputs to all stages of a project - from exploration through feasibility to production. In particular, the integration and 3D visualization of various datasets using modern software is a powerful tool. SRK’s two-day workshop includes a combination of classroom presentations, case studies and exercises. It is designed to equip the participants with the tools and confidence to apply structural geology effectively, and add a thorough structural understanding to their research and value to their projects.

PALEONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Reading and Writing of the Fossil Record: Preservational Pathways to Exceptional Fossilization

When: Sat., 18 Oct., 9 a.m.–6 p.m.
Where: Vancouver Convention Centre West, 211
FREE—no registration needed and no course attendance limit
Instructors: Marc Laflamme, Univ. of Toronto; James D. Schiffbauer, Univ. of Missouri; and Simon Darroch, Yale Univ.

 
Learn more www.paleosoc.org
 

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