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Pardee Keynote Symposia

Topical Sessions

Pardee Keynote Symposia

Special Sessions

Discipline Sessions

Pardees At-A-Glance

SUNDAY

8 a.m.–noon

P1 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: 125 Years of Exploration and Geoscience with GSA and the National Geographic Society: Celebrating the Rich History of Geoscientist Explorers Who Have Broadened Our Horizons and Knowledge of Our World.

P10 Paleotopography.

1–5 p.m.

P5 Evolution of the North American Cordilleran Lithosphere.

P6 Energy and Health: The Emergence of Medical Geology in Response to the Shale Gas Boom.

MONDAY

8 a.m.–noon

P3 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: In the Footsteps of Geology Giants.

P9 From the Sahara to Mars and Beyond: The History and Future of Aeolian Research.

1–5 p.m.

P8 Fossil Fuel Production, Economic Growth, and Climate Change.

TUESDAY

8 a.m.–noon

P4 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology: Past, Present, and Future.

P13 “Water, Water, Everywhere …” in the Solar System.

1–5 p.m.

P12 Resourcing Future Generations: What Needs to Be Done in the Near Term to Meet Demand for the Mineral Resources Needed in the Long Term?

WEDNESDAY

8 a.m.–noon

P2 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: Advances in Understanding Earth Structure and Process from EarthScope.

1–5 p.m.

P7 Back to the Future: Eocene–Early Oligocene Climatic Response to Geological Processes and Implications for the Future Earth.

P11 Rare Earth Elements: Minerals, Mines, Magnets (and More).

Pardee Keynote Symposia are named in honor of GSA Fellow and benefactor Joseph Thomas Pardee (1871–1960) via a bequest from Mary Pardee Kelly. Pardee is perhaps best known for his work on Glacial Lake Missoula.


P1. 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: 125 Years of Exploration and Geoscience with GSA and the National Geographic Society: Celebrating the Rich History of Geoscientist Explorers Who Have Broadened Our Horizons and Knowledge of Our World
GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division; Karst Waters Institute (KWI); GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI); GSA Planetary Geology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division
Cory W. Black Eagle, University of Kentucky; George Veni, National Cave & Karst Research Institute; Barbara EchoHawk, Metropolitan State University of Denver
This session will showcase the intimate linkage between geology and exploration, both historically and currently. Speakers are scientist-explorers who have made contributions to the discipline over the last 50 years, as well as today’s geoscientists who are pushing the frontiers of science and providing us with new views of planet Earth. Individual speakers will represent different arenas of exploration and study: caves, mountains, oceans, polar regions, deserts, plains and grasslands, jungles, and planetary geology.
Karst; Tectonics; Planetary Geology
P2. 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: Advances in Understanding Earth Structure and Process from EarthScope
GSA Geophysics Division
Eugene D. Humphreys, University of Oregon
The three components of EarthScope—the seismic USArray, the geodetic Plate Boundary Observatory, and deep drilling of the San Andreas fault—provide observations that give earth scientists truly unprecedented access to the inner workings of continents and the deeper Earth. This symposium will highlight work using EarthScope data that has advanced our understanding of Earth structure and process, often with fundamentally surprising insight.
Geophysics/Tectonophysics/Seismology; Tectonics; Structural Geology
P3. 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: In the Footsteps of Geology Giants
GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division
Marjorie A. Chan, University of Utah; R.M. Clary, Mississippi State University; K.R. Aalto, Humboldt State University
Many “geology giants” dramatically impacted geoscience with pivotal discoveries, explorations, and contributions. As our science looks forward, we learn from the past and follow in the footsteps of those who went before us. This session invites speakers to highlight the life of notable North American geoscientists (no longer living) who promoted ground-breaking ideas that historically changed the discipline and directed its future progression.
History and Philosophy of Geology; Stratigraphy; Structural Geology
P4. 125th Anniversary Pardee Symposium: Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology: Past, Present, and Future
GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division
Jim E. O'Connor, U.S. Geological Survey; Alan R. Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey
This session looks at the past, present, and future of Quaternary geology and geomorphology: Where have we been? What have we learned? Where are we headed? This all-day program begins with a morning highlighting our discipline’s accomplishments over the past decades through the perspectives of top-notch QG&G scientists. In the early afternoon, emerging early-career scientists will identify the most recent advances and possible future directions in QG&G research. These oral sessions are to be followed by a late-afternoon session of contributed posters amplifying these topics. This will be a day for all to celebrate GSA’s role in Quaternary geology and geomorphology.
Quaternary Geology; Geomorphology; History and Philosophy of Geology
P5. Evolution of the North American Cordilleran Lithosphere
GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; Geochemical Society; GSA Geophysics Division
Anne F. Sheehan, University of Colorado; Christine Siddoway, Colorado College; Basil Tikoff, University of Wisconsin
This session focuses on the geodynamic evolution of the North American Cordillera with an emphasis on the U.S. West. Its goal is to integrate the entire tectonic history of the region on the crustal to lithospheric scale, emphasizing the relationship of ongoing geological phenomena to the lithospheric architecture inherited from past geological events.
Structural Geology; Geophysics/Tectonophysics/Seismology; Geochemistry
P6. Energy and Health: The Emergence of Medical Geology in Response to the Shale Gas Boom
GSA Geology and Health Division
Thomas Darrah, Duke University; Saugata Datta, Kansas State University; Robyn Hannigan, University of Massachusetts - Boston
This session aims to increase the relevance of “Geology and Health” by integrating a multidisciplinary set of researchers actively engaged in critical aspects of shale gas development. Topics will include recent advances in research approaches surrounding this highly public and contentious issue.
Geology and Health; Environmental Geoscience; Petroleum/Energy
P7. Back to the Future: Eocene–Early Oligocene Climatic Response to Geological Processes and Implications for the Future Earth
GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology); GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; Mineralogical Society of America; Paleontological Society; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; Geochemical Society
Yildirim Dilek, Miami University; Philippe Claeys, Vrije Universiteit Brussel; Christian Koeberl, University of Vienna
The major climatic shifts in Earth’s history 55–33 million years ago indicate the significance of our need to understand climate changes and their causal mechanisms to better predict the future climate trends. The rates/amplitudes of these changes and the forcing mechanisms are still debated. We need to better document the mode/nature of those geological/impact processes during the Eocene that produced significant CO2 output and withdrawal in and out of the atmosphere. This symposium will serve as a forum to address many of the questions on the Eocene climate, geology, and paleogeography, and to develop strategies and new directions in addressing these topics.
Volcanology; Paleoclimatology/Paleoceanography; Paleontology, Diversity, Extinction, Origination
P8. Fossil Fuel Production, Economic Growth and Climate Change
James W. Murray, University of Washington; Charles A.S. Hall, State University of New York
Evidence indicates that global crude oil production has reached a supply limit and that coal production may be smaller than many believe. The impacts on current and future economic growth and the extent of future climate change need to be evaluated. Public awareness of this global situation is limited; there needs to be open discussion of these issues. The objectives of this session are (1) assessment of the most recent data for fossil fuel resources and production; (2) recognition of constraints on the global economy and on climate change; and (3) consideration of policy implications.
Economic Geology; Coal Geology; Environmental Geoscience
P9. From the Sahara to Mars and Beyond: The History and Future of Aeolian Research
GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; International Society for Aeolian Research; Society for Sedimentary Research; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division
Nicholas Lancaster, Desert Research Institute; Alan F. Halfen, University of Kansas
Ralph A. Bagnold explored the deserts of Libya more than 75 years ago and effectively created the field of modern aeolian science, which today extends beyond the dunes of the Sahara millions of miles to Mars. This session will explore the history of aeolian research and highlight current advances and future research avenues within the field through a mixture of presentations by internationally renowned career scientists, early-career scientists, and students.
Quaternary Geology; Sediments, Clastic; Planetary Geology
P10. Paleotopography
GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division GSA Geophysics Division
Mark T. Brandon, Yale University; Frank J. Pazzaglia, Lehigh University
Paleotopography has long fascinated geoscientists who assemble the stratigraphic, tectonic, and geomorphic evidence of past landscapes. Well-established and emerging techniques in geochronology, thermochronology, stable-isotopes, geomorphology, biology, biogeochemistry, basin analysis, and seismology are offering new and more detailed insights into past landscapes, specifically the deep Earth processes that uplift rocks and the erosional processes that tear them down. This topic has engendered interest across the geoscience spectrum and has invited spirited debate focused on high-interest landscapes, such as the western U.S. (including Grand Canyon), the Alps, and the Andes.
Geomorphology; Tectonics; Geophysics/Tectonophysics/Seismology
P11. Rare Earth Elements: Minerals, Mines, Magnets (and More)
Mineralogical Society of America
Anton Chakhmouradian, University of Manitoba; Frances Wall, Exeter University
Rare earth elements (REE) are all around us, not only in nature, but in our everyday lives: in every car, smartphone, and energy-efficient lamp, as well as in ceramics, lasers, and more. The realization that rare earths are essential to the progress of technology and science but that their supply is currently limited has brought these elements into the headlines and created a critical-metals agenda. This symposium will provide a forum for discussion of the key aspects of REE behavior in Earth systems and of those challenges that face geoscientists, technologists, and industry involved in the rare earth business.
Geochemistry; Mineralogy/Crystallography; Economic Geology
P12. Resourcing Future Generations: What Needs to be Done in the Near Term to Meet Demand for the Mineral Resources Needed in the Long Term?
International Union of Geological Sciences; Global Geoscience Initiative
Ian B. Lambert, Canberra, Australia
There are major challenges in meeting the needs of future generations, given rapid increases in demand resulting from the burgeoning global population and the aspirations of developing countries. Constraints that will need to be overcome will be discussed and an initiative being planned by IUGS to address these will be outlined. Details of this initiative will be developed at the “Future Resources Summit” in 2014 in China, which will bring together international experts from government agencies, research groups, and industry. This will involve detailed discussions with a view to reaching agreement on priority activities, funding arrangements, and parties involved.
Economic Geology; Geology and Public Policy; Geoscience Information/Communication
P13. “Water, Water, Everywhere…” in the Solar System
GSA Planetary Geology Division
Devon M. Burr, University of Tennessee; Robert C. Anderson, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
This session will provide an overview of ongoing discovery of water throughout the Solar System and its potential for in-situ resource utilization and supporting life.
Planetary Geology

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