Short Courses

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Most professional development courses and workshops offer CEUs. One CEU comprises 10 hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction.
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Two-Year College Faculty
Subaru of America

Thanks to Subaru of America Inc., 45 two-year college professors (at least half-time) who attend any one short course will be reimbursed
US$100! For more information, please contact Davida Buehler.

LOCATIONS

CCC = Colorado Convention Center
Hyatt CCC = Hyatt Regency Colorado Convention Center
Auraria Campus = 900 Auraria Parkway, Tivoli Student Union

The early registration deadline was 23 September; registration after 23 September costs an additional US$30. Prices shown below now include this increase. The cancellation deadline (30 Sept.) has also passed.

Can I take a short course if I am not registered for the meeting?
YES!
You’re welcome to—just add the meeting nonregistrant fee (US$40 by 1 Oct.) to your course enrollment cost. Should you then decide to attend the meeting, your payment will be applied toward meeting registration.

Why am I having trouble registering for my course online?
If you have already registered for the Annual Meeting then you must call GSA Sales and Service to add a short course to your existing registration. Please call 303-357-1000 and select option 3.

GSA K–12 teacher members: You are welcome to take short courses without registering for the meeting or paying the nonregistrant fee.

Click here for
Associated Society
Short Courses

The following short courses are open to everyone.

Preregistration is highly recommended to ensure that courses will run. Contact Jennifer Nocerino, for additional information.

501. Introduction to Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) for Earth Science Research. [FULL]
Fri., 25 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Dr Boulder, CO 80301. A bus will leave the Colorado Convention Center at 7 a.m. to take attendees to the course. If you chose to drive, directions can be found here.
US$84; includes lunch. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO; Marianne Okal, UNAVCO; David Phillips, UNAVCO; Carlos Aiken, The University of Texas at Dallas Cosponsor: UNAVCO
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This one-day short course will provide earth science faculty, students and professionals with an introduction to the principles of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS - a.k.a., ground-based lidar). TLS enables the capture of very high-resolution three-dimensional images of geologic features, and has emerged as a powerful tool for applications ranging from outcrop mapping to documentation and analysis of active earth surface processes. The course will focus on TLS technology, data collection, processing and analysis workflows, and examples of science applications. The course will consist of a combination of lectures and hands-on demonstrations of TLS equipment and data processing.

502. Sequence Stratigraphy for Graduate Students. [FULL]
Fri.–Sat., 25–26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Centennial Ballroom F
$US55. Limit: 55. CEU: 1.6. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Art Donovan, BP; Morgan Sullivan, Chevron; Bret Dixon, Anadarko; Bob Stewart; ExxonMobil
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil; BP; Chevron; Anadarko; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division
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This 2-day short course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts, and methods of sequence stratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide the stratigraphic record. This methodology allows the identification of coeval facies, documents the time-transgressive nature of classic lithostratigraphic units, and provides geoscientists with an additional way to analyze and subdivide the stratigraphic record. Using exercises that utilize outcrop, core, well-log and seismic data, the course provides a hands-on experience to learning sequence stratigraphy. The exercises include classic case studies from which many sequence stratigraphic concepts were originally developed. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

503. Field Safety Leadership.
Fri.–Sat., 25–26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Mineral Hall A
US$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 24. CEU: 1.6. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore. Instructor: David Story, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company & ExxonMobil Exploration Company
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Participants will acquire and practice strategies and tactics to prepare for and conduct safe and effective field activities. The first day of this fully interactive course covers common injuries, why accidents occur (human factors analysis), American Red Cross First Aid - When Help Is Delayed certification, and the field safety process in normal operations and emergency response through scenario analysis, problem solving, and role play. On the second day, participant teams take turns leading a model field day at a site near Denver, including briefings, driving, hiking, risk assessment, intervening for safety, safety equipment use, and emergency response drills. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

504. Introduction to Petroleum Structural Geology. [FULL]
Fri.–Sat., 25–26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Quartz A-B
US$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.6. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Peter Hennings, ConocoPhillips; J. Steve Davis, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company
Cosponsors: ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division
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The purpose of the course is to introduce MS and PhD geoscience students and faculty to the fundamental sub-disciplines within petroleum structural geology including approaches to seismic structural interpretation, reservoir geomechanics, and trap analysis. The course uses practical exercises to emphasize the application of structural interpretation to studies of petroleum entrapment, reservoir deformation, and the interaction of multi-phase fluids with geologic structures and reservoirs. The course lasts two days, and participants need to attend both days to gain the maximum benefit. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

505. Structural and Stratigraphic Concepts Applied to Basin Exploration. [FULL]
Fri.–Sat., 25–26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Mineral Hall B-C
US$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.6. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Lori Summa, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; Bob Stewart, ExxonMobil Exploration Company
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Company; ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division
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This course will explore concepts, methods, and tools of petroleum geoscience used on a day-to-day basis in the energy industry. We focus on how we make decisions with limited information, evaluate risk vs. uncertainty, and maximize value from integrated teams. Day 1 reviews fundamental stratigraphic and structural concepts. Day 2 is an applied problem in basin exploration. Students will make play maps, bid on prospective acreage, and analyze individual prospects within that acreage. Throughout the course we stress integration across disciplines and scales, focusing on interaction and expression of basin formation, fill, and evolution processes from regional to prospect scale. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

506. Volcanic Crisis Awareness.
Fri., 25 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., and Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. Hyatt CCC, Agate A-B
US$55. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.2. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Bruce Houghton, University of Hawaii; Kristine Kosinski, University of Hawaii Cosponsor: National Disaster Preparedness Training Center
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The National Disaster Preparedness Training Center at University of Hawaii (NDPTC) together with Alaska, Cascades, and Hawaii observatories have developed a FEMA awareness course entitled “Volcano Crises”. We are offering at GSA to reach an audience of graduate students and university faculty with interest in volcanic hazards. The 1 ½-day course provides an introduction to volcanic crises in the United States and an understanding of: processes, impacts, and causes of volcanic hazards; volcano monitoring and warning protocols; community response to volcanic unrest and eruptions. There are a total of 7 taught modules, including eruption case studies, culminating in a 4-hour desktop scenario simulating a future eruption at Mauna Loa volcano. Upon successful completion of the course, participants receive a FEMA certificate.

507. Effective Strategies for Teaching Diverse College Students. [canceled]
Fri.–Sat., 25–26 Oct.,

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This participatory workshop provides faculty with effective strategies, classroom-ready tools, and instructional materials designed to effectively teach diverse student populations. These approaches intellectually engage students through collaborative learning through targeted tutorial activity and scaffolded inquiry investigations using online Earth and planetary science data. Focused on instructors interested in engaging a wide diversity of non-science majoring students, the workshop is appropriate for faculty, post-docs, grad students, and advanced high school teachers. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops, equipped with MS Office and a wireless connection.

508. Helping Students Succeed in Geoscience Courses at Two-Year Colleges. [FULL]
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Auraria Campus, LoRaine Good Room
US$55; includes lunch. Limit: 48. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Eric Baer, Highline Community College; Robert Blodgett, Austin Community College District
Cosponsors: National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT); NAGT Two-Year College Division
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Improving student success in two-year college (2YC) geoscience courses is especially challenging because of the wide range in age, ability, backgrounds, and life circumstances of those enrolled. This workshop will bring together 2YC faculty and other educators to share successful approaches, strategies, and programs for working with all students, both in and outside the classroom. Participants will learn how recent research on student learning, group interaction, and instruction can help support student success. Because no 2YCs are alike, the workshop will address a range of research-supported techniques and strategies for adaptation to local needs.

509. Near-Surface Geophysics for Non-Geophysicists.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Centennial Ballroom D
US$140; includes course materials. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.8.
Instructor: Gregory Baker, University of Tennessee
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This one-day short course--designed for faculty, and students with little or no background in geophysics--provides a brief overview of state-of-the-art near-surface geophysical techniques and applications. The principle objectives for participants are to develop sufficient comprehension of methods to (1) better understand potential applications (including pitfalls and constraints) to their present/future research, and (2) be able to more readily interact and define objectives with geophysical experts when developing collaborations. We will focus on surface (as opposed to borehole) techniques and include seismic (reflection, refraction, and surface waves), ground penetrating radar, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods.

510. Three-Dimensional Geologic Mapping.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Room 708/710
US$105, includes lunch. Limit: 65. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Richard Berg, Illinois State Geological Survey; Harvey Thorleifson, Minnesota Geological Survey; Hazen Russell, Geological Survey of Canada
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The workshop is designed for those constructing 3D geological maps and numerical models. Our objective is to bring together people dealing with large datasets, and who must integrate variable quality data with high quality data to construct 3D geological models, mainly for hydrogeologic and engineering applications. Topics will include (1) methods of model construction, (2) managing diverse data of variable quality, (3) ensuring data interoperability, (4) visualization tools, and (5) interaction between mappers, hydrogeologists, engineering geologists, and engineers. We will emphasize deposits that host potable groundwater. We also extend an invitation to those dealing with 3D mapping of sedimentary basins.

511. Introduction to the Theory and Methods of (U-Th)/He Thermochronology. [FULL]
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CU Boulder, Geological Sciences, UCB 399, 2200 Colorado Ave Boulder, CO 80309. A bus will leave the Colorado Convention Center at 7 a.m. to take attendees to the course location.
US$105; includes lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Rebecca Flowers, University of Colorado–Boulder; James Metcalf, University of Colorado–Boulder
Cosponsors: Australian Scientific Instruments; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Volcanology, and Petrology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division
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This course will introduce participants to the practice and theory of (U-Th)/He thermochronology, and provide them with the background, resources, and tools necessary to use, interpret, and understand He data. It will focus on the most common He applications (using apatite and zircon), but will also introduce some of the emerging and novel He thermochronologic techniques and applications. We are particularly interested in attracting students and early career faculty, however this course will be useful for any scientist interested in (U-Th)/He thermochronology.

512. Using Laser Ablation Split Stream (LASS) Geochronology and Petrochronology to Address Tectonic and Petrologic Questions. [FULL]
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Room 711
US$55; includes lunch. Limit: 25. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: John Cottle, University of California at Santa Barbara; Andrew Kylander-Clark, University of California at Santa Barbara; Bradley Hacker, University of California at Santa Barbara Cosponsor: Nu Instruments
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Simultaneous isotopic (e.g., U/Th-Pb) and elemental analysis of minerals by laser ablation split-stream ICP mass spectrometry (LASS) is the latest tool for addressing tectonic & petrologic questions. This course will introduce the types of isotopic and elemental analyses that are possible and show how in situ analyses of accessory minerals in thin section can be applied to quantify igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary processes. This practical course is aimed at faculty members, researchers, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about the state-of-the-art in petrochronologic research. For further details, see http://sites.google.com/site/icpgeolucsb/

513. Laser Ablation ICP-MS: An Overview of the Technique and a Look at New Advances in Quantitative Microanalyses for Geological, Biological, and Environmental Applications.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Room 709
US$170, includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Alan Koenig, U.S. Geological Survey; Ian Ridley, U.S. Geological Survey
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This course is an overview of Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) as it applies to geological, biological and environmental samples. This course intended for both current and potential users of LA-ICP-MS and the data provided by the technique. Topics to be covered include overview of LA and ICP systems, a summary of traditional applications of LA-ICP-MS to geological samples and new directions for elemental and isotopic analyses by LA-ICP-MS. The course is taught from both the perspective of fundamental understanding of the technique and real life (practical) applications through examples.

514. Modern Digital Geologic Mapping Techniques. [FULL]
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Room 604
US$132; includes lunch. Limit: 25. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Terry Pavlis, The University of Texas at El Paso; Steven Whitmeyer, James Madison University; Jose Hurtado, The University of Texas at El Paso; Richard Langford, The University of Texas at El Paso
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Digital geologic mapping software and field computers have reached the stage that digital mapping has made paper mapping archaic. This class will teach basics of digital geologic mapping using a variety of software packages that encompass virtually all hardware platforms. The emphasis will be on well tested systems using ArcPad and QuantumGIS but will also include demonstrations of FieldMove (windows systems) and GIS mapping apps on iPads. Participants are encouraged to bring their own hardware, but working field systems will be provided where needed.

515. Fundamentals of Mudrock chemostratigraphy: Handheld XRF Analysis, Calibration, and Interpretation.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Centennial Ballroom E
US$50. Limit: 84. CEU: 0.8.
Instructors: Harry Rowe, Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin; Alexander Seyfarth, Bruker Elemental; Bruce Kaiser, Bruker Elemental
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This day-long course will take participants through (1) X-ray fundamentals, (2) analysis of mudrocks, (3) interpretation of mudrock chemostratigraphy, and (4) calibration of handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation.

516. Introducing ImageRover: Free Software for the 3-D Visualization and Analysis of Mars Field Data Using MER Images.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. Auraria Campus, Burghardt Room
US$55. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.4. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a
US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Martha-Cary Eppes, University of North Carolina–Charlotte; Andrew Willis, University of North Carolina–Charlotte
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The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), Spirit and Opportunity have captured hundreds of thousands of images of the surface of Mars. Many of these images have associated 3D data, yet the average geologist has no way to easily translate that information into relevant field measurements. We have developed software that allows for both visualization and analysis of MER 3D images. This course will provide the participants with 1) an overview of MER data formats and availability, 2) instructions how to search for images of interest in the MER database using our software, 3) instructions for how to collect 3D measurements on those images including strikes and dips, surface roughness and point to point distances and 4) online access to the software. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore. Participants must bring their own laptops

517. Optical Properties of Minerals in Thin Section: Quantitative Methods in Birefringence.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. Hyatt CCC, Mineral Hall D
US$70. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Instructor: James Nicholls, University of Calgary
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Upper division undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty will learn to use birefringence as a quantitative rather than a qualitative tool. Students will learn how to combine crystallographic features, optical features, and quantitative estimates of birefringence to determine the orientation of crystals in thin section. They will be able to make statements that range from the less precise: The wave normal must be between 20 degrees and 40 degrees from the Bxo, to the more precise:The wave normal lies in (010), approximately 25 degrees from the a-axis.

518. Modernizing the Seismology in Your 100- and 200-Level Geoscience Courses. [canceled]
Sat., 26 Oct.

519A. Teaching Geoscientific Thinking: What Does It Mean and How Do I Do It?
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. CCC, Room 703
US$85 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$85 for combined courses (add 519C or 519D). Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Instructor: Anne Egger, Central Washington University
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
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The methods and ways of thinking that are intrinsic to Earth science differ in important ways from the experimental procedures that are commonly taught in schools as the scientific method. The phrase geoscientific thinking encompasses the ideas that describe what makes geoscience unique as a discipline yet still clearly part of science as a whole. This half-day workshop will highlight ways to help diverse students learn and develop geoscientific thinking skills appropriate for their level. Participants will explore general strategies for teaching geoscientific thinking and modify an existing activity to integrate geoscientific thinking more explicitly.

519B. Teaching and Learning about Climate in Geoscience Classrooms.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. CCC, Room 705
US$85 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$85 for combined courses (add 519C or 519D). Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Tamara Ledley, TERC; Anne Gold, University of Colorado; Deb Morrison, University of Colorado
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
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Participants will be introduced to a suite of engaging, peer-reviewed classroom activities for learning about climate science. Participants rotate through stations highlighting some of the activities featured in the NSF-funded digital library for educational resources from the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN, cleanet.org). A brief introduction to the nationally endorsed Climate Literacy Principles will provide a necessary mental framework for planning your next climate lessons.

519C. Integrating Sustainability into Geoscience Courses.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. CCC, Room 703
US$85 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$85 for combined courses (add 519A or 519B). Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Instructor: David Gosselin, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
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Sustainability is a central theme for teaching about the environment and requires the integration of perspectives from science, economics, and society. Workshop participants will work to strengthen the teaching of sustainability through the increased integration of geoscience and sustainability education. Participants will share successful strategies and materials for teaching sustainability.

519D. Teaching Energy: Important, But Unfamiliar, Concepts, Emerging Themes & Grand Challenges.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. CCC, Room 705
US$85 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$85 for combined courses (add 519A or 519B). Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: James Meyers, University of Wyoming; Mark Lyford, University of Wyoming
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers
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Cheap, reliable and abundant energy powers the modern world. But increasing global demand, declining conventional primary energy sources, sustainability of renewable resources and the environmental impacts of energy all contribute to make energy one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. Preparing our students for this challenge requires addressing traditional geoscience topics, e.g. oil, coal, petroleum, as well as topics rarely covered in traditional geoscience courses, e.g. externalities, energy transitions, energy return on investment, life-cycle assessment, thermodynamic efficiency. This workshop will introduce earth science instructors to different energy perspectives. It will provide background content knowledge, examine effective pedagogical techniques for teaching these concepts, demonstrate examples of proven active classroom activities and strategies and show how these themes have been incorporated into a variety of undergraduate courses at different grade levels and in different disciplines. A key component of the workshop will be to introduce participants to sources of energy data, the primary energy research literature and how to leverage the wealth of information coming out of the business and technology communities that tie into all energy themes and that are useful in demonstrating the relevancy of energy and its different perspectives to students. In this manner, participants will be introduced to the tools that will allow them to incorporate energy into their own teaching.

520A. Teaching Controversial Issues 1: Climate and Energy.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. Auraria Campus, Senate Chambers
US$50 for one course—or get two-for-one! —US$50 for combined courses (add 520C or 520D) Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Richard Kissel, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Tanya Furman, Pennsylvania State University
Cosponsor: The Geological Society of America Teacher Advocate Program
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Climate and energy are topics rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

520B. Yellowstone National Park as a Hotbed for Inquiry—For Teachers.
Sat., 26 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon. Auraria Campus, John Good Room
US$50 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$50 for combined courses (add 520C or 520D) Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Nancy West, Quarter Dome Consulting; Shelley Olds, UNAVCO Cosponsor: The Geological Society of America Teacher Advocate Program
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This course for teachers focuses on data-rich classroom-ready lessons and activities exploring Yellowstone’s dynamic landscape. Middle and high school teachers will investigate the region’s eruption history, hydrothermal activity, seismicity, and land deformation using GPS, LiDAR, and INSAR. While the module focuses on Yellowstone, the park’s deformation leads to examining more general tectonic activity, natural hazards, and crustal deformation and strain throughout tectonically active areas of the West. Pedagogy will include hands-on models, demonstrations, analyzing data, and discussion of how to use these materials in teaching. All of the activities and data in this UNAVCO-sponsored workshop are free to the public.

520C. Teaching Controversial Issues 2: Evolution of Life and Earth.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. Auraria Campus, Senate Chambers
US$50 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$50 for combined courses (add 520A or 520B) Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth; Richard Kissel, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History; Laura Guertin, Pennsylvania State–Brandywine; Tanya Furman, Pennsylvania State University Cosponsor: The Geological Society of America Teacher Advocate Program
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Evolution and Earth history are rife with controversy, which provides challenges and opportunities for teaching. This is one of two connected courses on controversial issues that may be taken separately or together. Questions addressed include: Why are certain issues controversial? How do controversial issues differ from one another? How can we help learners focus on deepening understandings rather than fortifying positions? What does the history of controversy teach us about dealing with these issues? Both courses will investigate the teaching of controversial issues from theoretical perspectives and provide nuts-and-bolts strategies to make teaching such topics more effective and less divisive.

520D. Introduction to Critical Zone Science and Observatories.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. Auraria Campus, Reitze Room
US$50 for one course—or get two-for-one!—US$50 for combined courses (add 520A or 520B) Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8. Participants are required to bring their own laptops. Instructor: Timothy White, Pennsylvania State University
Cosponsors: National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory Program; Geological Society of America Teacher Advocate Program
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The Critical Zone encompasses the thin outer veneer of the near-surface Earth extending from the top of the vegetation canopy down to subsurface depths at which fresh groundwater freely circulates. Interdisciplinary and integrative science of the Critical Zone is relatively new - thus participants will learn about an emerging realm of multi- and interdisciplinary science from which new concepts are being advanced. Participants will work through a series of exercises that access publicly available on-line data. Participants can expect to develop a learning module that can be introduced into their classrooms. All participants must bring a laptop.

521. U-Pb geochronology and Hf Isotope Geochemistry Applied to Detrital Minerals.
Sat., 26 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. CCC, Room 707
US$75, includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.7. Instructor: George Gehrels, University of Arizona
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Participants will be introduced to the fundamentals and applications of U-Th-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope geochemistry, especially as applied to detrital minerals. The course is ideal for faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about these isotope systems and how they can be applied to studies of provenance and source terrane characterization. Topics will include: basics of the U-Th-Pb and Lu-Hf decay systems; measurement methodologies and challenges; data analysis; coordinated application to detrital minerals; and future directions. The course is focused on the use of Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

522. New Tools for Teaching Earth History: Global Geology.com, Ancient Earth App, and The PALEOMAP PaleoAtlas for ArcGIS. [canceled]
Sat., 26 Oct.

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If you teach Earth History or your research work requires an understanding of the history of Plate Tectonics, Paleogeography, or Paleoclimatology, then this course is for you. We will demonstrate and provide copies of new software, computer animations, and online tools that can be used to visualize the history of the Earth. These tools include: Ancient Earth, an app for the iPad & iphone; the GlobalGeology.com website - a wikipedia for Geologists that allows you to download Google Earth-style paleoglobes, and the PALEOMAP PaleoAtlas for ArcGIS.

523. Mars for Earthlings: Introductory Earth-Mars Teaching Resources for Higher Education.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. Auraria Campus, Burghardt Room
US$55. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a US$25 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Marjorie Chan, University of Utah; Julia Kahmann Robinson, University of Utah
Cosponsors: NASA; National Association of Geoscience Teachers; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Geobiology and Geomicrobiology Division
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A half-day Mars For Earthlings (MFE) workshop will introduce lesson modules applying Earth analog concepts to recent Mars imagery in an effort to engage students in STEM disciplines. This workshop is aimed at any faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students teaching undergraduate introductory earth or planetary science. Participants should bring a laptop to work through exercises that utilize Google Mars and JMARS software. Activities will cover broad themes of Mars surface processes, astrobiology, and mineralogy. Many of the teaching resources will be accessible online. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a $25 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

524. Getting Started in Undergraduate Research for New, Future and Current Faculty.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. CCC, Room 604
US$65. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Lydia Fox, University of the Pacific Cosponsor: Council on Undergraduate Research Geosciences Division
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This workshop is for faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students. Topics will focus on integrating research practices into the classroom, scaling projects for students, effective approaches to mentoring undergraduate researchers, identifying funding sources. Based on the demographics of our participants, we may also include information on how to get a job at an academic institution where undergraduate research is required/emphasized.

525. Communicating Science: Tools for Scientists.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. Hyatt CCC, Mineral Hall G
US$55. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4. Upon completion of the course, students will receive a
US$10 coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore.
Instructors: Tiffany Lohwater, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Christa Stratton, Geological Society of America; Kasey White, Geological Society of America
Cosponsors: GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Geology & Public Policy Committee; GSA Geoscience Education Division
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Scientist-communicators who can present messages clearly and foster respect between science and the lay public are essential for true public engagement with critical scientific issues. Scientists are increasingly requested by their institutions and funding agencies to extend beyond the scientific community and communicate their research directly to public audiences, but traditional scientific training typically does not prepare scientists to be effective public communicators. This workshop from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) will give you guidance on how to hone your public communication and outreach skills and the opportunity to practice in a safe and comfortable setting. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a US$10 coupon redeemable at the GSA onsite bookstore.

526. Integrating GPS, LiDAR, InSAR, and Other Geodesy Data into Undergraduate Courses.
Sat., 26 Oct., 1–5 p.m. Auraria Campus, John Good Room
US$50. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Instructors: Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO; Vince Cronin, Baylor University; Gareth Funning, University of California at Riverside Cosponsor: UNAVCO
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Despite its growing importance to research in societally critical fields such as hazard mitigation and climate change, geodetic techniques and data are seldom found in undergraduate geoscience courses. In this UNAVCO-sponsored short course participants will learn about a suite of activities, relevant to both major’s (structures, geophysics, tectonics, geomorphology, volcanology, and more) and introductory courses, that feature geodetic data investigations. A primary focus will be use of GPS data to understand regional strain and earthquake hazards but resources for teaching with airborne and terrestrial LiDAR and InSAR will also be included. Presenters include material authors and instructors as well as technical experts.

527. High Relief Clinoforms in the Colville Foreland Basin, Arctic Alaska. [canceled]
Thurs., 31 Oct.

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Lower Cretaceous strata of Arctic Alaska represent one of the world’s largest clinothems in a foreland basin setting. Architectural elements of the clinothem include a foredeep wedge comprising basin-floor fan facies, high relief (>1 km) marine-slope clinoforms, and shallow marine to nonmarine topset strata. This course combines introductory lectures and examination of a unique core collection from all architectural elements of the clinothem. The geologic context of each core is established using seismic and wireline log data. A key objective is the presentation and discussion of tectonic and basin processes that produce high relief clinoforms in a foreland basin.

GSA ASSOCIATED SOCIETY COURSES

NOTE: GSA does not handle registration for these courses. Please use the contact information provided online to learn more and to register.

FEES (U.S. dollars) Through 30 Sep. After 30 Sep.
Members $895 $995
Non-Members $995 $1,095
SEG Student Members $495 $545
Non-Member Students $545 $595
Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)

SEGModeling Structural Evolution to Improve Geological Models for Exploration and Mine Development.
Thurs.–Fri., 24–25 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Limit: 40.
Instructors: Jennifer Ellis, Midland Valley; Oskar Vidal Royo, Midland Valley.
Register at www.segweb.org/events.
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This 2-day course is geared towards developing awareness of interpretation uncertainty in geological modeling, the consequent economic risk and to become familiar with state-of-the-art structural modeling techniques to address this uncertainty and risk. The course is particularly useful for Geologists in Mineral Exploration and Resource Development working with structurally controlled deposits and/or deposits that have been deformed.

Paleontological Society
Paleontological Society

Ecosystem Paleobiology and Geobiology.
Sat., 26 Oct., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., CCC, Room 207
FREE, with no registration needed and no course attendance limit.
Instructors: Andrew Bush, University of Connecticut; Sara Pruss, Smith College; Jonathan Payne, Stanford University.
Learn more at www.paleosoc.org.

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